TGG’s Top Posts in 2017

I started The Genetic Genealogist on February 12, 2007 with my first post, “New estimates for the arrival of the earliest Native Americans.” There were few educational resources for genetic genealogy back then, and all testing was Y-DNA and mtDNA. Although 23andMe would launch the first large-scale atDNA test a few months later in November of 2007 (see “23andMe Launches Their Personal Genome Service” announcing the $1,000 test), it would be a couple of years until they used the results for cousin matching. Today, almost 11 years later, there are 617 posts with more than 310,000 words.

Here’s a screenshot from the blog in December 2007:

This year I posted about 30 times about a wide variety of topics. Here are the most popular posts in 2017:

  1. Are You Doing Everything to Identify Your Matches?
  2. August 2017 Update to the Shared cM Project
  3. GUEST POST: The McGuire Method – Simplified Visual DNA Comparisons
  4. AncestryDNA’s Genetic Communities are Finally Here!
  5. Using Shared Matches – A Quick Example
  6. Clustering Shared Matches
  7. Thinking About a BigY Test at Family Tree DNA?
  8. A DNA Case Study: Revealing a Misattributed Parentage Event with DNA
  9. The Danger of Distant Matches
  10. Sharing Large Segments With a Match Does Not Validate Small Segments Shared With That Match

Is it just me, or are you equally amazed that some of these things happened just this year?!?

Looking forward to more DNA in 2018!

 

 

 

 

 

1 Response

  1. Mike Barry 10 January 2018 / 3:45 pm

    Hello, and thank you for the great Blog.

    I am interested in Phasing my own kit to reconstruct my late father’s signature, less of course his mtDNA which I don’t have access to through other relatives as he was a only child. At Gedmatch I have phased my mother to myself and my mother to my sister, I have also my mother’s brother my uncles on record too, and finally a third cousin on paternal side. I am waiting for my daughter’s test kit to arrive, so this will be an interesting time as my wife is also tested, and her father, Mother on the to do list. The reason I am writing is to ask if you know of anyone who has made their own phasing software or would phase for me AND return me a file, as Gedmatch is undoubtedly a great site they do not as far as I know allow down loading of the processed kits like phasing. I have been taking a detailed look at the three kits using the facilities of MsExcel. I have been surprised by the amount of calls that are common to the three of us, I’d say 80% at least on the CH1 and X that I’ve looked at so far. I’m trying to think of exactly how I can compare and extract what will be my father’s contribution, the complication is that the results are not co-herent in the position of the calls ( thing that I read this from your blog), and I’m as yet unsure how to decide which are the SNPs from the comparisons. The base kits are from 23andme and as well as the expected calls AA,CC and CT, CG etc, there are no call=, DD, DI, I and II, which I’ve Email for an explanation to 23andme. The other major issue is that as I understand it females have two X, one inherited complete from their father, and the second is a hybrid of the two X from the mother, BUT the number of results is not large enough to account for two X reads, and there is no second X as I have seen in kits from other testing houses ( I’m tested at the three major companies). I will continue to explore but it would be great to see the results of other’s efforts and /or know the algorithm used, any ideas? Thank you

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